Changing Education for the Better: Education Pioneer Eva Moskowitz

Eva Moskowitz was born in 1964 in New York City, New York. She grew up in Morningside Heights, Manhattan and attended Stuyvesant High School. While she was attending high school, she uncovered a widespread cheating epidemic with a coverup by the principal, and was generally not satisfied with the level of education she received there. Eva Moskowitz went on to study at the University of Pennsylvania, where she pursued and obtained her B.A. with honors in history. Then she went to Johns Hopkins University, where she received her Ph.D. in American History.

After she graduated with her Ph.D., Eva Moskowitz got a position teaching Women’s History at the University of Virginia from 1989 to 1990, then she moved on to teach at Vanderbilt University from 1992 to 1993 as an assistant History professor. She also taught at the College of Staten Island in 1994 and 1995, and chaired a seminar at Columbia University from 1996 to 1999.

Eva Moskowitz started her first charter school in Harlem in 1996, serving 196 students. Her charter schools put a high focus on education and strategic thinking. They have thousands of students competing on debate teams and math teams, as well as consistently achieving very high scores in math and reading. The students play chess as a way to develop strategic thinking skills as well. She believes in keeping children engaged with group projects, debate teams, and one-on-one time with scholars and teachers.

Eva Moskowitz has also made her mark by writing two books as well as directing and producing a documentary in 1997. She has run for and served in public office with the chance that she will run for public office again in the future. She is known for her hard-hitting style to get positive results as well as her relying on her past experiences in both public offices and with the school systems. She has already redefined what it means to have a productive learning environment and will continue to do so for years to come.

 

 

 

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